Taking Reservations for Thanksgiving and Christmas

Taking Reservations for Thanksgiving and Christmas

Santa's Helper

Santa’s Helper

Are you entertaining the idea of traveling over the Holidays and really don’t want to take your pup with you?  We would be happy to care for him/her for you!

Please check out our boarding and daycare requirements on either service page (the requirements for one service are the same for the other).

If you would like to make a reservation, under the New Clients tab, please fill out the Boarding and Daycare Application.

We are booked up for these two main Holidays weeks in advance as space is very limited, so please get your reservation requests in soon.

 

BIG Mid-October Discounts!

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It’s the time of year to smell the aroma of homemade apple pies baking in the oven, to hear the crunching sound of crisp, Autumn leaves disintegrating under foot and–to watch pups play in the cool air.

KYPSAH is offering dog daycare and boarding specials for the month of October–a perfect opportunity for you to grab some “me time” and get organized for the upcoming Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays!

These specials are good for new and existing clients (we prefer to call clients “friends” but we’re using the word clients so you know this means YOU, too).  The special prices also boast all of the extra goodies…what our friends have also come to also love about our service…to include, but isn’t limited, too:   Free picture or video updates via text or email, free extra pictures, if any, sent to you via Shutterfly, no additional costs for special diets, all treats and beds we provide and even special off-leash excursions weather and other variables permitting.

Offer Details

10.4.13 680

Service:  Daycare

Special Discount:  20% Off

Discount Code:  daycareOCT2013

Valid dates:  10/14 – 10/30, Mondays through Fridays only, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

 

Rules and restrictions:  This offer is for one dog only.  This offer does not apply to multi-dog families, which are already discounted.  This offer cannot be combined with other offers, discounts or promotions.  Must state discount code at time of reservation in order to obtain discount.  Please see the Daycare service page for pup requirements.  All qualified candidates must fill out and submit electronically, the Boarding and Daycare Application.

 

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Service:  Boarding

Special Discount:  20% Off

Discount Code:  boardingOCT2013

Valid dates:  10/14 – 10/30

 

Rules and restrictions:  For nights 10/14 – 10/30.  This offer is for one dog only.  This offer does not apply to multi-dog families, which are already discounted.  This offer cannot be combined with other offers, discounts or promotions.  Must state discount code at time of reservation in order to obtain discount.  Please see the Boarding service page for pup requirements.  All qualified candidates must fill out and submit electronically, the Boarding and Daycare Application.

[pullquote_left]Space is limited so get your reservations in now![/pullquote_left]

Yes, We Still Take Care of Cats

As of September 6, we will only be offering dog boarding and daycare, as well as, pet taxi service for picking up and dropping off the pups.  We will no longer be offering the service In-Home Visits.  We haven’t stopped completely taking care of kitties though!

[pullquote_right]We will be retaining our longtime policy of offering free, every other day cat checks (this applies to Woodland residents only) for cats whose dogs are boarding with us.[/pullquote_right]

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us 😀

Travel First-Aid Tip for Dogs: Snakebite

Introduction

Warning:  Graphic pictures of snakebite victims within this post!

We are placing a series of travel first aid tips for dogs on our website.  These tips were written for the “Canine Companion – Instructions & First-Aid Tips that came with the Emergency First-Aid & Travel Kit for Dogs by Dr. Brooks Bloomfield of The Doctor’s Office for Pets located in Truckee, California, a well-known, highly-respected veterinarian with over 30 years of superbly practicing veterinary medicine on wildlife and domesticated animals.

Calis-Tale-Once-BittenThere are so many times that we as pet owners long to have a great veterinarian’s advice on-hand 24/7 so that we’re not left with so many questions during stressful situations when something has happened to our beloved pup especially when traveling (doesn’t it always happen that these situations arise on weekends, too, when your veterinarian’s office is closed).

This travel first-aid tip deals with:  Snakebite

“Snakebites are frightening experiences.  Most envenomations in the United States are caused by pit vipers, which include the rattlesnakes, cottonmouth and copperhead. 

Snake venom is actually a combination of toxins and the severity of an envenomation is related to the strength and amount of venom injected, as well as the site. 

The best approach is to keep the patient as quiet as possible and seek immediate veterinary attention.  First aid is of little benefit.  Diphenhydramine (Diphen is included in the kit) may be helpful in lessening both anxiety and some of the reaction but should be given by mouth only to a completely conscious dog, followed by immediate transport.  Sucking, cutting or applying a tourniquet to the area is of no benefit. 

Some signs of snakebite show up after several hours to days so watch any suspected bite victims closely.”

Note:  References to items or supplies noted in the above instructions were made in reference to the supplies that came in the Emergency First-Aid & Travel Kit for Dogs in conjunction with these instructions.

chiefpit

In Honor of Chief

This post in honor of Chief who died protecting his family.

*Images courtesy of petdoctors.co.uk and cesarsway.com.

[pullquote_right]Wishing you and your fur-kids safe and happy travels this summer![/pullquote_right]

Travel First-Aid Tip for Dogs: Vomiting

Introduction

We are placing a series of travel first aid tips for dogs on our website.  These tips were written for the “Canine Companion – Instructions & First-Aid Tips” that came with the Emergency First-Aid & Travel Kit for Dogs by Dr. Brooks Bloomfield of The Doctor’s Office for Pets located in Truckee, California, a well-known, highly-respected veterinarian with over 30 years of superbly practicing veterinary medicine on wildlife and domesticated animals.

There are so many times that we as pet owners long to have a great veterinarian’s advice on-hand 24/7 so that we’re not left with so many questions during stressful situations when something has happened to our beloved pup especially when traveling (doesn’t it always happen that these situations arise on weekends, too, when your veterinarian’s office is closed).

This travel first-aid tip deals with:  Vomiting

“Vomiting is a common dog “emergency”.  In many cases, vomiting is protective in helping clear the stomach. 

Dogs can get mild viruses and other infections that result in vomiting.  Persistent or violent vomiting is a cause for concern and should be evaluated by a veterinarian. 

Treatment for an upset stomach is similar to people.  Food and water should be withheld for up to 24 hours to let the stomach quiet down.  Small sips of water are good, and ice cubes in a bowl (to lick not eat) work well to provide water without distending the stomach.  Dio-Tame can be administered to help settle the stomach.  After resting the stomach, feeding bland food such as hamburger meat or cooked chicken with all the juice and fat drained off mixed equally with boiled white rice in multiple, small meals, gives the stomach a chance to recover.  After a few days, you can reintroduce the regular diet.”

Note:  References to items or supplies noted in the above instructions were made in reference to the supplies that came in the Emergency First-Aid & Travel Kit for Dogs in conjunction with these instructions.

*Image courtesy of County Vets

[pullquote_right]Wishing you and your fur-kids safe and happy travels this summer![/pullquote_right]

Travel First-Aid Tip for Dogs: Ticks!

Introduction

We are placing a series of travel first aid tips for dogs on our website.  These tips were written for the “Canine Companion – Instructions & First-Aid Tips that came with the Emergency First-Aid & Travel Kit for Dogs by Dr. Brooks Bloomfield of The Doctor’s Office for Pets located in Truckee, California, a well-known, highly-respected veterinarian with over 30 years of superbly practicing veterinary medicine on wildlife and domesticated animals.

There are so many times that we as pet owners long to have a great veterinarian’s advice on-hand 24/7 so that we’re not left with so many questions during stressful situations when something has happened to our beloved pup especially when traveling (doesn’t it always happen that these situations arise on weekends, too, when your veterinarian’s office is closed).

This travel first-aid tip deals with:  TICKS!

“Ticks are a common problem and can carry diseases that affect you and your dog.  Careful removal is important!  Wear the included gloves and grasp the tick with the neck of the tweezers just above the points.  Grasp right down where the tick has glued itself to the skin and lift up steadily. 

After removal, the tick should be burned or drowned in alcohol.  Do not crush it as the blood can contain organisms that can infect you.  Clean the site where the tick was attached and apply a small amount of triple antibiotic ointment. 

After the tick is removed, there may be a scab or crust that persists for several days.  If it swells, becomes painful, or persists then see your veterinarian.”

Note:  References to items or supplies noted in the above instructions were made in reference to the supplies that came in the Emergency First-Aid & Travel Kit for Dogs in conjunction with these instructions.

*Tick image courtesy of Rainbow Valley Veterinary Clinic

[pullquote_right]Wishing you and your fur-kids safe and happy travels this summer![/pullquote_right]

Accepting Reservations for Labor Day Weekend

Just a quick schedule note that we still have openings, for most services, over the Labor Day Weekend (remember, we will be closed from September 6 – 30) so get your requests in soon because we book-up pretty fast due to limited space.

If you’re a new client, make sure to follow the “New Client” tab to fill out the appropriate form or application to get the ball rolling faster and make sure to give us as much notice as possible (at least a week’s notice) within your reservation request.

If you’re an existing client, just shoot us a text or email message that you need service and we’ll get right back with you ASAP.

To read our blog entries and see many daily pictures of KYPSAH in motion, check out our Facebook page (there are discounts for those who “like” us, too…hint, hint).

Travel First Aid Tip for Dogs: Exhaustion

Introduction

We are placing a series of travel first aid tips for dogs on our website.  These tips were written for the “Canine Companion – Instructions & First-Aid Tips that came with the Emergency First-Aid & Travel Kit for Dogs by Dr. Brooks Bloomfield of The Doctor’s Office for Pets located in Truckee, California, a well-known, highly-respected veterinarian with over 30 years of superbly practicing veterinary medicine on wildlife and domesticated animals.

There are so many times that we as pet owners long to have a great veterinarian’s advice on-hand 24/7 so that we’re not left with so many questions during stressful situations when something has happened to our beloved pup especially when traveling (doesn’t it always happen that these situations arise on weekends, too, when your veterinarian’s office is closed).

This travel first-aid tip deals with:  Exhaustion.

“Exhaustion occurs in dogs just like us.  It is important to rest the exhausted dog and to provide water, electrolytes, and glucose.  Take the temperature to be sure your dog is maintaining it in the normal range.  If possible, give your dog the thirst quencher included in the kit.  Dilute it to half normal strength with water that is not chilled.  Take it easy even if your dog bounces right back.  Muscle or organ damage may not be immediately apparent.”

Note:  References to items or supplies noted in the above instructions were made in reference to the supplies that came in the Emergency First-Aid & Travel Kit for Dogs in conjunction with these instructions.

[pullquote_right]Wishing you and your fur-kids safe and happy travels this summer![/pullquote_right]

Important Service Change

Saying Goodbye to the Service:  In-Home Visits

By:  Jessie Riggs, Owner

Jessie and "Miss Pretty"

Jessie and “Miss Pretty”

As of September 6, 2013, we will no longer be offering the service In-Home Visits.  KYPSAH will only be offering dog boarding and daycare and all that goes with these two services to include the pet-taxi service—starting October 1, 2013 (we are closed from September 6-30).

Because KYPSAH is a family-run business and does not have employees, changes had to be made to the services as family members are gearing up to move in different occupational directions and the ability to sustain a full-service pet sitting company–by myself–just isn’t doable =/

It is truly with a heavy heart (I will miss all of my foster fur-kids terribly!) that I had to come to this decision but it was the only decision I could make with regards to the future direction of KYPSAH.  Some would say hire out to Independent Contractors or take on employees so that you can “grow” but neither of these options works for me personally and I’ll tell you why:
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  1. Independent Contractors (ICs) aren’t always reliable with the end result being the pet’s care suffering (this is not remotely acceptable to me).  Not all ICs are “bad” of course, but I’m not willing to go through the possible bad ones to get to the “good” ones.  You and your pets are far too important to me;
  2. KYPSAH is not a large enough company at this time to hire employees and take on the kind of overhead that expanding, to include employees, would entail;

[/checklist]
Restructuring KYPSAH, there are many short and long-term plans that primarily center around dogs (we don’t offer cat boarding), so I’m excited about the changes coming!  We will continue to provide free, every other day, cat checks for those clients whose dogs are boarding with us 🙂  These checks are no greater than 15 minutes however.  If you’re planning on being gone for more than a week, we recommend contacting someone who can give them a full in-home visit time-wise as cats get lonely, too.

Towards the end of the summer, we will be contacting you to schedule a time to give back your key(s), remotes, etc.  If you would like us to drop it off sooner, that’s not a problem.  Just let us know.

jordieEin

A happy Ein 🙂

Jordan, a.k.a. “Jordie”, will be offering her time, if and when she has it available (among other things, she is planning on getting a full-time job and going to college next year), to take care of in-home visits for people.  She will be doing this on her own apart from KYPSAH.  Therefore, you will need to contact her directly if you would like to request her to perform in-home visits for you at (530) 386-0291 (call/text).

Roger will no longer be aiding with in-home visits after this summer, as his path in life is taking him down a different road.

We will greatly miss the pets we currently are taking care of and hope to see pictures of them from time to time!

As always, if you have any questions, I would be more than happy to help you!  Just ask 🙂

Travel First Aid Tip for Dogs: Heat Stroke

Introduction

We are placing a series of travel first aid tips for dogs on our website.  These tips were written for the “Canine Companion – Instructions & First-Aid Tips” that came with the Emergency First-Aid & Travel Kit for Dogs by Dr. Brooks Bloomfield of The Doctor’s Office for Pets located in Truckee, California, a well-known, highly-respected veterinarian with over 30 years of superbly practicing veterinary medicine on wildlife and domesticated animals.

There are so many times that we as pet owners long to have a great veterinarian’s advice on-hand 24/7 so that we’re not left with so many questions during stressful situations when something has happened to our beloved pup especially when traveling (doesn’t it always happen that these situations arise on weekends, too, when your veterinarian’s office is closed).

This travel first-aid tip deals with:  Heat Stroke.

“Heat stroke is a medical EMERGENCY!  Dogs with temperatures above 105 degrees Fahrenheit are at risk of seizures and organ damage. 

Dogs should be cooled by immersion in cold water or by placing wet towels or blankets over them.  Avoid alcohol baths.  Place the wet cloths in the armpits and groin area, as well as, over the body. 

When the temperature of your dog is below 104, stop the cooling to prevent too much of a drop.  The goal is to reach 102 degrees in 30-60 minutes.  Take the temperature every 5-10 minutes for a while to make sure it continues to return to normal (101 – 102? F). 

Seek veterinary attention as soon as possible. 

Some heat stroke victims show signs of organ damage several days later so it is important to watch for abnormal signs after an episode.”

Note:  References to items or supplies noted in the above instructions were made in reference to the supplies that came in the Emergency First-Aid & Travel Kit for Dogs in conjunction with these instructions.

*Sunbathing dogs photo courtesy of caminoanimalclinic.com*

[pullquote_right]Wishing you and your fur-kids safe and happy travels this summer![/pullquote_right]